The Future of Wearables Makes Cool Gadgets Meaningful | The Atlantic

Frog Design

[…]

Frog Design Group, Frog, a global product strategy and design firm headquartered in San Francisco, was an early entrant to the wearables space, designing prototypes for Motorola back in 2002. In 2012, the design firm set a team of designers across its various international offices the task of coming up with eight different concepts for the wearables of the future, compiled in the brief “Wearable Technology and the Connected City.” About half were technologies that would deliver an environmental benefit. One—a face mask equipped with sensors that measure air pollution, designed by the Shanghai office—may be on the market soon; the rest are still just concepts, but they have helped to spark conversations with both product companies and government agencies about what’s possible when you combine civic aims with wearable technology. 

[…]

Some of Frog’s other concepts focus more on using wearables to make environmental issues more tangible for people. The “Tree Voice,” for example, was a network of displays on trees throughout the city of Austin, Texas, that would illustrate the effects various environmental factors—drought, pollution, chemical exposure—had on the tree, via displays attached to trees and a mobile app that would display what was happening with trees throughout the city.

 

Frog Design

 

One thing we really dug into was the fact that the environment—the living, breathing physical environment—is collecting and storing information about climate change and pollution all the time,” said Eric Boam, senior interaction designer at Frog in Austin. “If you cut open a tree you can see years where there was a lot of water and years where there wasn’t much, and you can see where pollution started to get worse. We wanted to take that information that the environment already collects and display it to people so they could see it more clearly and interact with it in a way that changes their behavior.”

[…]

 

+ artículo publicado en The Atlantic

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